5 Ways For Tweens and Teens to Get Involved in Coding this Summer

Estimated reading time: 3 minute(s)

We’ve gathered some of the best events from all over the city to mark on your calendars. If you have events you’d like to see on EQ’s calendar, submit them here!

School’s out for the summer, which means school age kids (and their parents) are looking for things to do. Making friendship bracelets at camp isn’t the only (or most beneficial) way to stave off boredom. EQ has curated a list of some local and national coding and programming opportunities. Our list shows there are many ways to awaken tech-savviness inside of kids and channel energy—before they get stir-crazy.

youth coding
Photo courtesy of Kode with Klossy

Call Your Girlfriend: Girls Who Code

Grades: 10th-11th grade girls
Learning: Coding through project-based experiences
When: 2017 opportunities are upcoming
Cost: Free
Girls Who Code is a national non-profit that aims to close the gender gap in tech jobs by cultivating a passion for computer science and coding in girls right when their interest (statistically) starts to drop off—age 13. By sponsoring free 7-week long classes for 10th and 11th grade girls, the organization teaches coding through project based learning Monday through Friday from 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. Dates and locations vary, but three sites in the St. Louis area are hosting Girls Who Code this summer. The opportunity to apply has ended for 2016’s St. Louis summer programs, but you can join the mailing list for next year here.

 

Cruise the Town: GlobalHack Youth Initiatives

Grades: Middle school- high school
Learning: Game design, scratch coding, etc.
When:
Ongoing
Cost: Free- $20
GlobalHack helps teens get plugged into tech all summer long with events happening in and around the St. Louis area. With game design workshops to scratch coding nights, middle school and high schoolers are able to choose stand alone classes. Most events are five dollars or are free. Conveniently, many begin at 5 p.m. or later in the evening–perfect for balancing rides and carpooling. To see specific events, dates, times, and register, click here. And be sure to register for the Back-To-School Youth Hackathon on August 20th.

 

Head to Camp: iD Tech Camps at Washington University

Age: 7-17 year olds
Learning:
Programming, engineering, robotics, game design, and 3D modeling
When:
June- August
Cost:
$799-$1,249
iD Tech Camp has hosted summer tech camps at Washington University for 11 seasons now. The week-long camps are broken into two age ranges: 7-14 year olds and 13-17 year olds. The full day camps offer courses in programming, engineering, robotics, game design, and 3D modeling. Unlike many other St. Louis-based tech camps, iD Tech isn’t free. Tuition ranges from $799-$1,249 for day classes, but the company also offers some promotions, discounts for referrals, and reduced cost for siblings. To view a full schedule and register, look here.

 

Break Some Stereotypes:  Kode with Klossy

Age: 13-18 year old girls
Learning: Ruby and Kode with Klossy curriculum
When: June 20-July 1, 2016 (St. Louis); 2017 TBD
Cost: Free to accepted applicants
This year, after 2015’s successful initiative with 20 girls, Kode with Klossy has launched their first summer camp. There will be three summer camp locations: St. Louis, New York City, and Los Angeles. Each camp consists of 20 girls ages 13-18. It’s a highly sought after cohort, because each student receives a full tuition scholarship. Learn more here, so you can throw your hat (or YouTube application) into the ring next year.

 

Go on a Staycation: YouthDigital (Online)

Age: 8-16 year olds
Learning: Coding, design, and gaming
When:
On your on time
Cost: $249.99 (for most)
YouthDigital offers summer camps in cities across the nation, but St. Louis isn’t one of them. Instead of going to camp for an in-person experience, they also have created courses in coding, gaming and design appropriate for kids ages 8-14. If your child doesn’t have a defined interest yet, they have a quiz to help pick a class that would interest them. Instead of being bound to a class schedule, the 30 (give or take) hours of instruction can be started and stopped over the course of the year. So students can fit the classes in with the rest of their summer agenda. Courses cost $249.99 and have a 30-day money back guarantee.